Needlework as Influence

Kristen Kieffer Flower bricks Embroidery patterns in Periwinkle and Green

Fashion (from all eras, Elizabethan to Couture) has been a long-time influence for my work. The structure and detail of clothing inspire my own functional pottery forms and their decoration. Basically, there is always something new for me to uncover from clothing and textiles as influence. My most recent revelation is the expansive genre of needlework, which includes everything from crochet and embroidery to a myriad of techniques I’ve only begun to learn.

Kristen Kieffer Deluxe clover cup in GrapeI own pillow cases tatted by my Grandma and Great Grandma, love quilts of all kinds, and knew that some of the 18th century clothes I adore had embroidery, but I’ve only just recently tuned into the wide-ranging variety of needlework design as influence, particularly for slip-trailing. I’ve been collecting needlework pix and details here with some faves below. New adventures into deco have begun!

Flower bricks and cups as pictured above, as well as other pots with deco influenced by embroidery and quilt appliqué are available in my online Etsy shop.

Detail of Look 8, Erdem Spring 2013 Ready-to-Wear  Crochet flora  Embroidery flowers Sashiko embroidery  Aemilia ars needlelace  [Micro] quiltingCourt Suit embroidery detail, c. 1770-85  Antique Carolina lily applique quilt detail c. 1880  Reticella samples

Rollover or click on the images above for details. Pictured: Crochet, embroidery, sashiko, aemilia ars lacework, quilting, applique, and reticella.

Polka Dot Origin, Influence, & Faves

Dots on my pots!

  Corset series vessel w. dots    
  

My recent work with dots: Screen vase pair, yunomis, flower vessel (Corset series), pitcher, small covered jars, small stamped bowls, and plate.

I started layering dots (and stripes, which will be a future blog post with more influences and faves) in early 2010. The added pattern came through self-critique and seeing a need to both visually pop the raised slip-trail patterns by providing small background color, as well as add some modern fun to the Victorian flavor of my work.

So the primary purpose for the polka dots was to further my love of layered surfaces for the pots, formally creating even more richness and depth. The dots punctuate the patterns.

A close secondary function for the dots has been to add some joyfulness; polka dots are rarely somber. Though I do receive some comments by folks who favorably see ‘Disney,’ I think my pots can appear more serious than I actually am or intend. In some ways, I’m still the five-year-old tomboy who hated my freckles (my own personal polka dots), deciding one summer day that, with the aid of my grape-smelling marker, they would be much better purple. So, the dots are a way to include my influences of sweets, for example, as well as infuse connotations of informality and playfulness.

You can check out all the dotty pots in my online shop here.

Polka dot influences below with more here:

    
  
    
    

Norma Kamali dressTattoo round rug by Deanna Comellini  
  

.Pictured above from top right, first row: Peter Murdoch ‘Dot chair’ for kids; Dot window building in Beirut, Lebanon; and ‘Confetti’ tree skirt.  Second row: Draga Mathilde sofa; and Yayoi Kusama concept store for Louis Vuitton.  Third row: June Leaf organic canvas in Marine; Mod fashion;  and vintage dress.  Fourth row: White-grey ombre dot cake; paper straws; and slipper chair.  Fifth row: Norma Kamali dress; Tattoo round rug by Deanna Comellini; and ‘Op-art Attracts’ wedge by ModCloth.  Last row: Quilt in progress by Judy Martin and starfish.

The origin of the Polka Dot: It is believed that the name “polka dot” came from the Polish polka dance, and first appeared by name in 1854 in The Yale literary magazine. At the same time that the polka dance and music began in the mid 19th century, polka dots were popular and common on clothing. The pattern name was chosen simply because the dance gained such acclaim, which led to many contemporary products and fashions also taking the name. (There used to be “polka-hats” and “polka-jackets,” for example.) Most disappeared with the popularity of the actual polka dance in the late 1800s. Only the printed fabric pattern remained fashionable, and the name stuck.

Polka dot favorites of fellow studio potters and ceramic artists:

Andrew Martin  Brenda Quinn  Malene Helbak
Kari Radasch  Jun Kaneko polka dot sidewalk, Art Museum of South TX
Chiho Aono  Sandblasted process, Hans Tan Studio via Ateliér Keramiky  Ayumi Horie
Harrison McIntoshMeredith Host  Harumi NakashimaTetsuo Hirakawa  Betty Woodman  Sean O'Connell

Pictured above from top right, first row: Andrew Martin, Brenda Quinn, and Malene Helbak.  Second row: Kari Radasch and Jun Kaneko.  Third row: Chiho Aono, Hans Tan Studio, and Ayumi Horie.  Fourth row: Harrison McIntosh, Meredith Host, and Harumi Nakashima.  Last row: Tetsuo Hirakawa, Betty Woodman, and Sean O’Connell.

Pierced Pottery: Basket Faves & Influence

    

A couple weeks ago, I was in my studio pondering, and had a ‘piercing epiphany.’ I haven’t had time to do more than draw just yet, but am excited about expanding my use of piercing/reticulation/cut-outs (as pictured above) on some new and existing forms as a way to play with line, light and shadow, and form through articulated pattern.

The development of new forms paired with new surfaces is a given goal, but some days I feel more inspired (a.k.a. internally pressured) to bring that back-burnered desire to the fore. That drive usually sends me to my books on silver, my favored springboard for new forms. (It is perhaps odd to be influenced by centuries-old objects with functions so specific, many are now obsolete, but most any form for me can become an idea for a vase, which can then lead to many more ideas.)

So I was down in my studio thinking, but my books were upstairs and are worn from years of gleaning, and my computer was downstairs with me and filled with new, enticing images I’ve been bookmarking, so of course, I opened my computer. I visited my own Pinterest boards where I ‘pin’ both objects I enjoy (favorites) and objects that inspire my forms and surfaces (influence). A common thread popped out to me from my Form & Pattern, Oldies But Goodies, Ceramics: Vintage/Historical, and Ceramics: Studio Potters/Artists boards, and sent me to my sketchbook to draw: Piercing.

  

Pierced work was very popular in both silver and pottery in the 18th century (particularly the latter half) in England and Europe. I haven’t found specific information claiming so, but piercing seems a wonderful blend of form and function: the cut-outs allow air circulation (for food service and storage) while both visually defining form and lightening materials (silver, clay, wood) that can otherwise appear a bit more heavy or dense. (I sometimes envy glass’ ability to be simultaneously solid and transparent.) I also enjoy pierced elements in architecture, furniture, clothing, and many more mediums.

So, I’ve yet to get started on my own cut-outs, but have done some drawings, am very excited about minimal and maximal piercing (particularly for fruit bowls and baskets), and collected some of my favorite basket-y forms by fellow studio potters mixed in with ones from the 18th c. for you below. Enjoy, check out my new Pinterest board Cut-out & Cagey, and stay tuned for some pierced pots from my own studio!

                   
  

From top left: Rebecca Chappell; Shorthose & Heath creamware; and Kari Radasch. Second row: Dr. Wall chestnut basket, c. 1750s; and Bryan Hopkins. Third row: Baddelly creamware basket, c. mid 1700s; and Creamware basket, c. 18th century. Fourth row: Brian Jones; and Bruce Cochrane. Fifth row: Odette fruitbowl w. silver stand; Steven Godfrey; and Monticello creamware basket (reproduction). Sixth row: Malene Mullertz; and Julie Crosby. Seventh row: Spode Pierced Creamware Basket and Stand, c. 1820. Last row: Sunshine Cobb; and Remodelista ‘Farmer’s market basket’.

My Talented Hubby

I couldn’t resist taking a picture of my own bowl and breakfast the other morning: cantaloupe and matching stripes. I made the bowl, but it’s actually my husband’s bowl. I’m the unusual studio potter who doesn’t have a lot of my own pots in our all-handmade-pots kitchen. There are only two actually, this bowl and a white and red striped plate that’s a ‘third’ (not even a ‘second’), which I love to use. For the most part, I live with my work all day, most everyday in my studio, so the last thing I want to see when I’m not working is my own work. I have this sense that I would spend my meals critiquing my pots (why many potters smartly use their pots in the first place) instead of relaxing. I spend eight or so hours a day evaluating my pots’ form and function, so am happy to unwind by using other people’s pots —like the Tyler Gulden plate above— during my ‘off’ hours. So, like I said, the bowl is mostly my hubby’s. He saw it in my studio and claimed it, for ice cream.

Ginger Jar by Trevor Toney
Mitered and carved curly maple, paint, and shellac.
6″ h x 4 1/2″ w & d

He and I met ten years ago at the Worcester Center for Crafts where as an Artist-In-Residence I gave a slide lecture (with actual slides) and he attended as a student in the furniture/woodworking program. We began talking because he liked my work and we have similar influences. Of course, we’ve been together ever since, and while he is now a full-time preparator/exhibitions carpenter at the Worcester Art Museum and only able to make work part-time, we continue to share ideas and have informal critiques of each others’ work.

Last October was our five-year wedding anniversary, the Wood Anniversary if you follow such things, and though we would normally pay this no mind, he’s a woodworker and I’m married to a woodworker, so for love and fun, it just couldn’t be ignored. The Ginger Jar above was his gift to me. (He received a walnut-inlayed watch I scored on Ebay.) He’s a consummate maker, and I don’t feel the slightest bit biased in saying so. You will hear it here first when he opens his own Etsy shop, so stay tuned for fabulous, slightly mod objects and furniture with historical influence from my talented, darling hubby Trevor Toney! Check out the couple shots below of his mitering and carving process for my jar. Clay has nothing on wood for complexity…and math.

 

By the way, the jar ‘works’ beautifully. It’s personalized function is a bedside holder for my earplugs. (I’m a super light sleeper.) I like how the opened lid, which reveals the sublime tangerine orange that continues inside, with earplugs in place and shadowed flange look incidentally like a smile.
:-)

Pictorial: My Mentors

            

From the top, in reverse chronology: 2001-present, Artist-in-Residency and teaching at the Worcester Center for Crafts with Tom O’Malley. 1998-2001: Graduate school at Ohio University with Brad Schwieger, Joe Bova, Chuck McWeeny, Boomer Moore, and Vince Burke. 1997-98 Artist-in-Residency at the Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts with Pete Pinnell and Bill Griffith. 1996-97: Artist-in-Residency/Assistant at Plum Tree Pottery with John Glick. 1995-96: Internship at Greenfield Village at the Henry Ford Museum with Bryan Van Benschoten. 1993-95: Undergraduate school at the N.Y.S.C.C. at Alfred University with John Gill, Andrea Gill, Val Cushing, and Steve Rolf. 1991-93: Associate degree at Montgomery College, Rockville with Bob Devers, Don Montano, and Kevin Hluch.

For me, mentors are artists/ aesthetic coaches/ professors/ advisers/ career counsellors who I worked with for a couple days to several years; who offered me crucial support, guidance, and constructive criticism; and who influenced me as a maker, full-time artist, and instructor. I could spend pages posting quotes and sharing how each of these artists helped me ‘in the moment’ and over the years, but for now I thought it would be nice to pay a pictorial tribute. (I’ll have to do another post of peers, friends, and loved ones who I also consider big influencers, trouble-shooters, and butt-kickers.) Ironically, I don’t believe that what an artist makes can offer any real clues into how they teach and critique, but I’m lucky that I’ve had such an amazing collection of thoughtfully talented givers help me who are equally talented makers. I’m fortunate, and very appreciative.

Interest in Pinterest

interest. I’m on it, and either you are too, or I’m guessing you’ve never heard of it. Technically it is yet another ‘thing’ to do online, but it’s different (really!), and I’m completely addicted and want you to be too. Actually, it’s perfect if you’re someone like me who frequently bookmarks images into folders to your browser, which you can only see if each one is opened. So! Pinterest is a virtual bulletin board. A place for you to ‘pin’ what ‘interests’ you, thus ‘Pinterest.’ You have your own page where you can have as many pinboards as you’d like on which to pin images you find on the web, repin favorite images others have pinned, and upload your own new images in whatever way strikes your fancy.

I use Pinterest primarily to bookmark influences for inspiration, organize images for future blog posts and Power Point presentations, and minimally to dream about home renovation ideas and fashion purchases (which also inspire pots). Plus, I’m an image lover. Who doesn’t like pretty pictures of fabulous objects?

I’ve been ‘pinning,’ as they call it, for about six months and seem to have accumulated 20 separate pinboards of interests with over 900 images, including Form & Pattern, Color, Couture, Oldies but Goodies, Interiors & Objects, Props to Props, as well as three different ceramics boards (vintage/historical, studio, and industrial design).

So, you can learn more about Pinterest from the NY Times, request an invitation from Pinterest, and follow my pinboards. Below are some recent favorite pix, one each from most of my pinboards. Feel free to pin images from my website and online shops to your boards! Happy Pinning!