Ceramics in Design

Vautrin_Delvigne_Gauffre J_Adler_Brasilia_Stripes_Cone Delvigne_Vautrin_Panier_perce
J_Adler_Helix_vase Giapato_Hula_Hoop Lucchi_Burano blooming_over_cup_DroogR_McBride_Anamorphic_cups M_Wanders_Delft_vase_II R_McBride_Grooveware Eva_Zeisel_gravyandspoonairborne-snotty-vases-mwanders M_Wanders_Delft_vase_I M_Wanders_Delft_vase_IIIBoontje_Table_Stories Boontje_tile Boontje_Other_Side KleinReidStillLifeBlackBisque

First row, from left: Vase Gauffré by Ionna Vautrin & Guillaume Delvigne for Industreal; Brasilia stripes cone vase by Jonathan Adler; Panier percé by Guillaume Delvigne & Ionna Vautrin for Industreal; Second row: Helix tall vase by Jonathan Adler; Hula Hoop by Cristiana Giopato for Industreal; Burano by Michele de Lucchi for Industreal; Blooming over cup by Mina Wu & Jan B. for Droog; Third row: Anamorphic cups by Ross McBride; Royal Delft vase by Marcel Wanders for Moooi; Grooveware by Ross McBride; Gravy boat and spoon by Eva Zeisel; Fourth row: Airborne Snotty Vase by Marcel Wanders; Fifth row: two more Royal Delft vases by M. Wanders for Moooi; Table Stories by Tord Boontje; Last row: Primavera tile by Tord Boontje for Bardelli; The Other Side Ceramics by Tord Boontje for Moroso; and Still Lfe: Black Bisque by KleinReid.

I’ve done a couple of past posts with wallpaper, furniture and home furnishings by designers I enjoy, so thought I should point out some ceramics too.  (See past posts under Favorites and Influences.)   I find these objects and the concepts behind them intriguing (most from the last eight years), and this group of designers are some of my favorites: Boontje, KleinReid, McBride, Vautrin & Delvigne, Wanders and Zeisel.  There is a strong and curious connection between studio artists/potters and industrial designers: kind of a chicken-and-the-egg history with overlap and sharing (or co-opting).   (Objects that weren’t simply white and black (and royal blue apparently) were scarce.  There must be practical as well as design reasons for the lack of color.)   I feel it’s important to be aware of what other artists in my field are up to, and awareness of form and concept for mass and high-end design markets feels equally important, especially as the lines between art and design have blurred.  Ultimately though I agree with a friend and find these objects smart, appealing and inspiring.

3 thoughts on “Ceramics in Design

  1. What a great job you do with your blog. It’s a pleasure to see each time you publish something new. Your clean sense of design shows through as much with your blog as with your ceramic pieces.

  2. Pingback: “Veys,” “Veyz,” “Vahz” « Kristen Kieffer

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